Center for Domestic Violence Prevention

Press Releases

For the Media

The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence is an international campaign which takes place each year and runs from 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to 10 December, Human Rights Day. It was originated by activists at the first Women's Global Leadership Institute in 1991 and is coordinated each year by the Center for Women's Global Leadership. It is used as an organizing strategy by individuals and organizations around the world to call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls.

This year’s National theme is “From Peace in the Home to Peace in the Nation: Male engagement for the Safety of Women and Girls! Over the 16 days period the Domestic Violence Act Coalition will engage the communities under the national and regional theme; Every girl counts, what action will you take to keep girls in school?

The theme highlights the need to focus attention on the retention of girls in schools by highlighting structural discrimination of girls throughout the education system right from the home, the school setting, and government policy that impact girls access to education and their experience. The campaign builds onto global efforts to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education articulated in Sustainable Development Goal 4 and 5(Gender Equality) as well as the commitments by Government of Uganda to ensure universal education for all.

Although education is a fundamental human right and governments have committed to ensuring free and compulsory education for all, girls still find it hard to access and advance into higher levels of education. Girls face the biggest barriers in education including; early marriage, teenage pregnancy unfavorable policies, sexual harassment, rape and defilement, social and gender norms that prevent girls from accessing and completing school.

Currently in Uganda women and girls face violence at alarming rates. Reports indicate that;

  • 75% of Ugandan girls are sexually abused during their childhood .
  • Uganda ranks16th among 25 countries with 16% of girls married off by the time they are 15 years and 53% by the age of 18.
  • 59.6% of women from the age of 15 have ever experienced physical violence.
  • 39% of women have experienced sexual violence compared to 11%of men.
  • Women who have been physically or sexually abused by their partners are 1.5 times more likely to acquire HIV than women who have not experienced partner violence.
  • More than 1 in 5 women aged 15-49 in Uganda experience sexual violence at some point in time, compared to less than 1 in 10 men (UDHS 2016).
  • Yet only 42% of reported defilement and rape cases are investigated and arrests made and one in every four files registered by the Office of the Directorate of Public Prosecutions are closed due to lack of evidence.

THEME: Break the Silence, Break the Barriers! How Will You Make Education Safe for Girls?

Every November 25th - December 10th, the International campaign against violence against women and girls (VAWG) unites activists, organizations and individuals across the world to raise their collective voices during the 16 Days of Activism Campaign on violence against women and girls.

This year’s National theme is From Peace in the Home to peace in the Nation: Making education safe for all. Over the 16 days period the Domestic Violence Act Coalition will engage the communities under the regional theme; Break the Silence, Break the Barriers! How Will You Make Education Safe for Girls?

The theme highlights that we need to break the silence, demand and implore policy makers, parents, schools, and institutions to make education safe for all, specifically girls and young women, by highlighting and breaking the structural barriers that discriminate women and girls throughout the education system right from the home, community, and the school setting including government policies and systems that impact girls’ experience at school.

Can the Media Be Objective? - CEDOVIP
This document serves as a resource for media personnel on communicating gender in the media. It has been adapted from the materials that CEDOVIP uses during trainings on reporting about gender.

Journalists often believe that their role is to provide an objective perspective on news or current events. However, objectivity is more of a myth than a guiding principle. In reality, a person’s biases, opinions and beliefs will likely show through in the way that the journalist writes or asks questions. Rather than attempting to be objective, it is best to produce a balanced piece that demonstrates awareness of their own gender biases.